Dodgers News: Logan Forsythe, Justin Turner Checking Off Boxes In Rehab Assignment

Dodgers News: Logan Forsythe, Justin Turner Checking Off Boxes In Rehab Assignment

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Ron Cervenka-ThinkBlueLA.com

As the Los Angeles Dodgers continue to skid along, infielders Logan Forsythe and Justin Turner are on the verge of making their respective returns from injuries. Forsythe began a rehab assignment with High-A Rancho Cucamonga on Friday, and was joined by Turner on Saturday.

They both were again in the lineup Sunday afternoon, with Forsythe playing second base and Turner taking his turn as a designated hitter. Both anticipate joining the Dodgers when their road trip begins Tuesday in Miami.

“Everything felt good,” Turner said about his first rehab game. “Took a lot of swings, slid a couple times, had a couple plays on defense and came out of it feeling really good. I’m excited about that.”

He was quickly tested at third base as a pop-up went toward the dugout railing. Turner also fielded a hard-hit grounder while playing at the edge of the grass.

While Turner’s Gold-Glove caliber defense will be a boon for the Dodgers, his bat figures to be of more necessity to the team. Prior to beginning a rehab assignment, Turner participated in simulated games to further accelerate the process of seeing live pitching.

“That was very helpful,” he said. “Really helped kind of speed things up.”

As for Turner’s fractured wrist, he wears a protective pad throughout the entirety of a game. “I just tape it on my wrist, don’t really feel it,” Turner explained. “It’s there to, in theory, protect it. Hopefully I don’t have to find out if it works or not.”

As for Forsythe, his shoulder inflammation has subside and he’s content with progress being made at the plate. “I felt good. Felt good in the box, timing was there, took some good swings,” Forsythe said. “It’s kind of what you’re looking for in a rehab game. Recognizing pitches, staying in your zone.”

Both Forsythe and Turner are eager to join a Dodgers team that has wholly failed to meet expectations. “It’s tough for anybody that’s rehabbing while the guys are struggling,” Forsythe said.

“You feel like you want to get in there and help as much as you can. They’re fighting, they’re grinding. I think it’s tougher to be rebounding and not being around them to see how they feel. It’s a strong clubhouse. We’ll get right.”